Phillips-Fegley Family tree.  Up State, New York. Put together a few years ago, there are some holes in the narrative, and I am publishing it on the net, in an attempt to find the links.   Some very good stories to be found in here.

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Phillips-Fegley Family Tree Info.  Looking for missing parts.

Paul Phillips Pedigree Chart.pdf

Branches, First Version Given to Family.pdf

Ivan Phillips Family Side Papers.pdf  7 megabyte file

 

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Branches

 

20011212.0321 Wed , Dec 12, 2001, 3 21AM

Old Wagon Road, Yadkinville, North Carolina


This morning I have begun to re-organize this entire file. An audio tape that my father, Ivan James Phillips, and my mother, Frances Amelia Fegley Phillips is referred to. Other family papers are referred to. Charts I have made, after the way the Family Origins for Windows computer program my father started, are included. Though the organization must still be somewhat loose and easy, things will be aligned along family groups, most recent being last. Paul Lyndon Phillips.

 







 







 







Dad’s Side of the Family


Ivan James PHILLIPS

Sex:   Male

Father:          Lyndon Earle PHILLIPS (20 Oct 1892-13 Jan 1949)

Mother:         Amy Almira PATTERSON (29 Oct 1897-30 Mar 1946)

Birth   6 Sep 1925 in Phelps, Ontario, NY

Death 1:10 AM, 30 May 1997 in 521 Carla Drive, Huntingtown, Maryland, at 71

Military          Feb 1944 to June 1966 in Retired Ch Warrant Officer, US Army


Marriages/Children

1. Frances Amelia FEGLEY

Marriage       15 Aug 1947 in Seneca Falls, New York (age 21)

Children        Gale Frances PHILLIPS (24 Oct 1949-)

          Paul Lyndon PHILLIPS (12 Mar 1952-)


          Ivan James Phillips was born on September 6, 1925. Dad's parents were Lyndon Earle Phillips (born October 20, 1892) and Ami Elmira Patterson (October 29, 1897). Lyndon Earle Phillips' parents were William Wade Phillips (born May 2, 1867) and Permilla (Millie) Leroy. William Wade Phillips's parents were Curtis C. Phillips (born June 13, 1834) and Laura Delia Covert (born June 13, 1842). Curtis C. Phillips's parents were Franklin Phillips (born in 1810) and Laura,(born in 1810) whose last name is unknown.

           Ivan James Phillips’ mother, Ami Elmira Patterson's parents were Earle James Patterson (born September 28, 1864), and Ida Jane Watson (born September 18, 1867). Earle James Patterson's parents were Charles Patterson (born July 19, 1834) and Almira Arlintha Joslin (born May 3, 1840). Charles Patterson's parents were Arthur Patterson, (born May 15, 1805), and Sallie, whose last name is unknown. Ida Jane Watson's parents were Nathan Greenleaf Watson (born May 13, 1831), and Mary Barbara Walrath (born May 14, 1831).


The children of Ivan James Phillips and Frances Amelia Fegley, in order of age

Gale Frances

Paul Lyndon

A third child died in the womb. Ivan James is RH positive, and Frances Amelia is RH negative. In those days, the early 1950's, they had no way to treat for that. Often the children died. Often it was the second child, this time it was the third. I have always heard Mom refer to this third child as a boy, on the tape she says she did not. He or she was already decaying in the womb, so there was no way to tell.




Lyndon Earle PHILLIPS

Sex:   Male

Father:          William Wade PHILLIPS (2 May 1867-)

Mother:         Permilia (Millie) LEROY (-)

Birth   20 Oct 1892 in Phelps, Ontario, NY

Burial 1949 in Phelps, Ontario, NY (age 57)

Death 13 Jan 1949 in Clifton Springs, New York (age 56)

Marriages/Children

1. Amy Almira PATTERSON Marriage 13 Mar 1914 in Battle Creek?, Michigan (age 21)


From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My father was the source of this information, and in some places he cites a book on the Bi-Centennial of Phelps, New York: and these are generally his words:


The children of Lyndon Earle Phillips and Amy Almira Patterson, in order of age.

Imogene Joyce

Leroy , called Roy

Duane, died at eighteen months of the flu

Roger

Ivan James

Dick


LYNDON EARLE PHILLIPS WAS A STEAM ENGINEER.

          Lyndon Earle Phillips had been a mechanic working with steam, all his life.

          Railroads, and thrashing machines, and boilers, used steam to turn belts and make things run. William Wade Phillips, Lyndon’s father, used to run thrashing machines. He owned steam engines to run the thrashing machines. Lyndon worked with him. That is how he got his start with steam engines.

          One time in his life he was a fireman on a railroad. Railroads worked with steam engines back then. Then he worked in steam engines in the posting plant in Michigan.

          Almost everything used to run by steam. That is where you get the name “Steam Roller.” Steam shovels ran by steam. My dad used to run a steam shovel, and I used to go to work with him, when I was a kid.

          Lyndons’ fathers family, that of William Wade Phillips, had threshing machines. Charley Phillips one of the first to have a self-binder. Charley was wade’s brother.

          Charley Phillips (dad's great Uncle) was one of the first ones to do it. There were three other threshers who used steam engines: Bill Dunn, Will Phillips, and Wesley Anderson." Will Phillips was my grandfather. (William Wade Phillips.)  

            After Mark retired, they had Will Phillips, with his twelve-horse steam engine. "Next we had Raymond Phillips," who was Lyndon Earle Phillips' brother, "with a kerosene-fuel oil rig." Following Raymond Phillips we had Wesley Anderson.

          "Lyndon Phillips, worked for (the authors) dad at the time he purchased the Mogul tractor. Lyndon Phillips ran the Mogul tractor, and appeared to be happier then driving a team of horses. (The author's) Dad never drove a tractor, I was not familiar with that, living with tractors most of his life. They used to enjoy running a good team of horses."

          Lyndon Earle Phillips had been a mechanic working with steam, all his life.


Amy Almira PATTERSON

Sex:   Female

Father:          Earle James PATTERSON (28 Sep 1864-18 Aug 1948)

Mother:         Ida Jane WATSON (18 Sep 1867-Jun 1945)


Individual Facts

Birth   29 Oct 1897 in Battle Creek?, Michigan

Death 30 Mar 1946 in Geneva, New York (age 48)


Marriages

1. Lyndon Earle PHILLIPS

Marriage       13 Mar 1914 in Battle Creek?, Michigan (age 16)


From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My father was the source of this information, and in some places he cites a book on the Bi-Centennial of Phelps, New York: and these are generally his words:

               

          Paul: You said your mother came from Michigan. I never knew we had any family in Michigan.

          Dad: She was a Patterson, and that is where the tallness comes from in the family. My father's family is fairly short, the Phillips's are not overly tall. Roy and I were the shorter ones. Dick and Joyce and Roger were all tall. (He is speaking of his brothers and sisters.) My mother was a tall woman and her brothers were humongous. This was back in the thirties they were six-foot six and stuff. That was back when people were shorter. If they were five-foot-five than they were considered tall. It is not like the kids today when they get up to six. I will show you some pictures when I dig them out. They were just tall people. My mother's parents were tall people. That's going way back into the eighteen-hundreds.

          They were real lanky people, I mean exceedingly tall. Even today they would stand out in a crowd. In those days it was considered just weird to see such tall people.

          Paul: Where they dark haired too?

          Dad: No, they were all colors. A lot of them were light haired. I did not meet a lot of my cousins and stuff when I was growing up. My uncles and aunts started to come out to visit so we would see some of them during the summer.




William Wade PHILLIPS

Sex:   Male

Father:          Curtis C. PHILLIPS (13 Jun 1834-22 Aug 1900)

Mother:         Laura Delia COVERT (13 Jun 1842-15 Nov 1927)


Individual Facts

Birth   2 May 1867 in Phelps, Ontario, NY?


Marriages/Children

1. Permilia (Millie) LEROY

Marriage       16 Dec 1891 in Baltimore, MD (age 24)

Children        Lyndon Earle PHILLIPS (20 Oct 1892-13 Jan 1949)


From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My father was the source of this information, and in some places he cites a book on the Bi-Centennial of Phelps, New York: and these are generally his words:


           Paul: All of our people have been farmers then?

          Dad: On my side, yes, there are a whole bunch of farmers.

          Paul: All the way back, or as far as you remember?

          Dad: As far as I know. My uncles were farmers, my great-uncles were farmers that I know, around Phelps, New York. We lived in the small town of Phelps, 1500 people, and we were the city Phillips's. When I would go to visit my uncles and stuff it would be out on their farms. I remember, one, Raymond (Phillips), had no electricity. He had lanterns like Coleman lanterns all over his house. They hiss like mad and put out a bright light.

          Paul: That would have been in the thirties?

          Dad: Most of my memories would have been from the thirties and forties. A lot of them in the thirties, because I was born in twenty-five. Most of the group I am talking about now were in their nineties during my teenage years. My uncles and my father died young but my great-uncles and aunts were long lived. I knew them better than I did my uncles. (I am placing the note here because it appears dad is refering to the brothers of William Wade Phillips)


This note appears under Lyndon Earle Phillips as well, in the complete form:


          William Wade Phillips used to run thrashing machines. He owned steam engines to run the thrashing machines. Lyndon worked with him. That is how he got his start with steam engines.

          The family of William Wade Phillips, had threshing machines. Charley Phillips one of the first to have a self-binder. Charley was wade’s brother.

          Charley Phillips (dad's great Uncle) was one of the first ones to do it. There were three other threshers who used steam engines: Bill Dunn, Will Phillips, and Wesley Anderson." Will Phillips was my grandfather. (William Wade Phillips.)  

            After Mark retired, they had Will Phillips, with his twelve-horse steam engine. "Next we had Raymond Phillips," who was Lyndon Earle Phillips' brother, "with a kerosene-fuel oil rig." Following Raymond Phillips we had Wesley Anderson.


FURTHER NOTE ON CHARLEY PHILLIPS:

          Dad: Charley was one of my great uncles, one of Will Phillips’ brothers. He was the one that moved into town with his daughter when he was about ninety-five.

          Mom: That's what killed him, when he moved into town with his daughter.

          Dad: Yep , he was about ninety five, and had spent all his life on the farm. They were afraid for him, because he wanted to go out into the barn and all that stuff. They moved in him in with his daughter, and he did not last a year.



Curtis C. PHILLIPS

Father:          Franklin PHILLIPS (b. 1810); Mother: Laura UNKNOWN (b. 1810)

Birth   13 Jun 1834 in Sennett, NY

Military          9 Aug 1862 in New York - Harper's Ferry, Va (age 28)

Death  22 Aug 1900 in Phelps, Ontario, NY (age 66)

Marriages/Children

1. Mary Lee 21 Apr 1854 (age 19) Children Amelia (Meal) PHILLIPS (16 Sep 1859-9 Aug 1924)


Marriages/Children

2. Laura Delia COVERT 6 Apr 1866 in Baltimore, MD (age 31) Children WILLIAM WADE PHILLIPS (b. 2 May 1867)


Laura Delia COVERT

Birth   13 Jun 1842 in Baltimore, MD

Death 15 Nov 1927 (age 85)

Marriages/Children

1. Alfred Smith died at Sandy Hook PA or Harpers Ferry- was a Confederate?

2. Curtis C. Phillips (died); married 6 Apr 1866 in Baltimore, MD (age 23)

Children        William Wade PHILLIPS (2 May 1867-)

3. Haust


          Curtis was married twice, he was his second wife's second husband. She was eventually married three times, once after he died. I apologize to dad. It is not until recently that I have found just how much information he had transferred into this computer.

          Curtis C. Phillips at age 28 (Aug 9, 1862) enlisted at Phelps, NY. He served three years until June 3, 1865. He was mustered in as a Private in Co H, 126 NY Infantry. He surrendered Sep 15, 1862 at Harpers Ferry and was paroled (at this time the word paroled meant an equal exchange of prisoners from North & South) Sep 16, 1862;. Later transferred to One Hundred and Nineteen Company, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corp and eventually discharged with his regiment.

          Died of Heart Disease at his home, near Fridley Bros. mill, at about six o'clock in the evening. from his obituary, "Mr Phillips had been in rather poor health for some time and was prostrated last Monday while picking cucumbers. He picked cucumbers again yesterday morning and complained of feeling poorly. Just before his death he was seated on the front porch of his home engaged in paring an apple for his little grandson." Family Note: Harry (Hap) Fridley was the grandson to which this refers.


Second note from Dad, Ivan James Phillips:


photo copy of record shows enlisted at age 28 on Aug 9, 1862 at Phelps, NY, Mustered in 16-22 Aug 1862 as Pvt H Co 126 - Surrendered at Harpers Ferry, VA and Paroled on Sep 16, 1862 Period of service Aug 9, 1862 to June 3, 1865 Wesley Utter has fuller archive history

 

From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My father was the source of this information, and in some places he cites a book on the Bi-Centennial of Phelps, New York: and these are generally his words:


              Dad: My great grandfather was a Civil War veteran. It might have been my great-great-grandfather. (Note: Dad's Great Grandfather was Curtis C. Phillips, born 13 June 1834) My great-grandfather was the one who married twice. There were about eighteen kids. There were like six or eight with one and ten with another. If you see the pictures that Roger has ( my dad, Ivan's brother) the older ones are quite a bit older. It's a whole different family. Of course his wife died and in those days farmers needed another wife to keep it going.



The following excerpt is from

UPDATE - PHILLIPS FAMILY RECORD 1996

written by Marion Sweeney Johnson; 2924 Lake Avenue; Rochester, New York, 14612; phone 716-663-5913



CIVIL WAR RECORD OF CURTIS C. PHILLIPS


Co. H, 126th N.Y. Volunteers


          August 9. 1862 -- Enlisted, Phelps, NY

          August 22. 1862 -- the 126th N.Y. Volunteers mustered in at Camp Swift - Geneva, NY

          August. 26. 1862 - Curtis and the 126th left for Washington, D.C. for training. They sailed down Seneca Lake with flags waving and cannons booming along the way. They then took the railroad from Elmira, New York, to Baltimore, Maryland.

          August 28. 1862 -- With little training and orders to report to Harper's Ferry. They arrived there on the 28th, He was stationed at Maryland Heights, overlooking Harper's Ferry.

          September 15. 1862 -- In Action, Captured and Paroled at Harper's Ferry. They surrendered to the seasoned troops of Stonewall Jackson.

          September 17. 1862 - Marched to Moncacy, Maryland and camped there. Their destination was Annapolis, Maryland.

          September 21. 1862 -- Arrived Annapolis, Maryland.

          September 24. 1862 -- All of the Regiment, except those that were sick (as Curtis was according to the Archives), left on trains for Chicago (Camp Doulgas) to spend their parole time there - because of illness Curtis stayed in Annapolis, Maryland in a hospital.

          October 31. 1862 -- I believe this date may have been the end of his parole period -- this is in question because the writing on the Archives is difficult to read in some places.

          November 27. 1862 -- The 126th returned to Washington and marched to Arlington Heights where they were eventually re-equipped.

          December 3. 1862 - The Regiment moved to Union Mills and wintered along Bull Run doing picket duty at the outer defenses of Washington.

          September 24. 1862 - February 1863 - Sick at Annapolis, Maryland

          March and April 1863 --Curtis returned to his Regiment, and the Regiment moved to Centerville and continued guarding the approaches to Washington.

          May and June 1863 -- On June 29, 1863 he reported to the hospital in Fredrick, Maryland with back injury and piles.

          June 24 and 25 1863 -- The 126th were assigned to the Army of the Potomac, commanded by Joseph Hooker. They marched to Gettysburg, 3rd Brigade, 3rd Division 2nd Army Corp under Winfield Scott Hancock. On June 29 the 2nd Corps forced marched 33 miles towards Gettysbury. Hancock didn't let his men stop long enough to remove their shoes before crossing streams which caused the shoe leather to shrink and feet to become severely blistered. In spite of the bayonet prodding of the rear guard, only 8 of 54 from Company H arrived at Uniontown.

          July 2 and 3. 1863 -- The 126thfought at Gettysbury and helped repel Pickett's Charge: sustaining the highest casualties of the nearly 250 Union Regiments present.

          July and August 1863 -- Curtis in hospital at Annapolis Junction, Maryland

          September - December 1863 --Curtis still sick at Annapolis Junction --Updated records show that on December 2 I, 1863 he was with the Invalid Corps., 2nd Battalion. There is mention of a back injury at this time.

          January - April 1864 --Curtis transferred to Invalid Corps (Veteran Reserve Corps.) in Washington, D.C. area. He was assigned to the 119th Co. 2nd Battalion which was comprised of cooks and nurses around the hospitals. These men were crippled. Curtis may have been upgraded to 1st Battalion of the Veteran Reserve Corp. These men were able to handle weapons and were used for guard duty. Updated records show that as of Jan. 30, 1864, Curtis was still at Annapolis Junction and stayed in that area through December 1864.

          Updated :: February 3, 1864 , Curtis was transferred to 1st. Battalion.

          June 27. 1865 -- Honorably discharged, with his Regiment, in Baltimore, Maryland.





Franklin PHILLIPS

Sex:   Male

Individual Facts

Birth   1810 in Unknown Birthdate Date estimated

Marriages/Children

1. Laura UNKNOWN

Marriage       1830 in Phelps, Ontario, NY date place guesswork (age 20)

Children        Curtis C. PHILLIPS (13 Jun 1834-22 Aug 1900)

          - (-)

          Mrs. Sidney Wright (married name) PHILLIPS (1835-)






Dad’s Mother’s side of the Family


Ida Jane WATSON

Sex:   Female

Father:          Nathan Greenleaf WATSON (13 Mar 1831-4 Jul 1911)

Mother:         Mary Barbara WALRATH (14 May 1831-24 Oct 1915)


Individual Facts

Birth   18 Sep 1867

Death Jun 1945 in Grand Ledge MI Oakland Cemetery (age 77)


Marriages/Children

1. Earle James PATTERSON

Marriage       13 Mar 1887 in Michigan ? (age 19)

Children        AMY ALMIRA PATTERSON (29 Oct 1897-30 Mar 1946)

          Leon Earl PATTERSON (-)


Ida Jane Watson (Patterson) wrote and account about the History Of the Nathan Greenleaf Watson Family. It will be included under his name.


          Nathan Greenleaf Watson was the fourth son of Martin and Fanny Watson was born March 13, 1831, in Sacketts Harbor, New York. On October 13, 1855, he was married to Mary B. Walworth of Homer, New York and went to reside in German, Chenango County, New York, where their first three children were born.


The following is excerpted from a letter from Phyllis Glen Quiltmaker, in 1995. Address: 308 Woodruff; St. Union City, Mi.; 49094. She notes which people are our ancestors.

Family of Ida Jane Watson Patterson


          This information came from records that my nephew found for me at Michigan State University.


          Thomas Brigham came to America, an indentured servant to a Mr. Ralph Hudson, who was a draper- a maker of cloth. Brigham, who was born in 1603, became a freeman at Cambridge, Mass. in 1636. He died in 1653- age 50 years,



          Thomas Brigham, aged 32 yrs., embarked from London, England April 18, 1635, aboard the ship, Susan and Ellyn, Edward Payne, Master.


1st generation: Thomas Brigham

m. Mercy Hurd in 1637.

5 children: Mary, John, Hannah, Samuel, and Thomas, (our ancestor.)


2nd generation: Thomas Brigham, b.1640, d. 9/16/1728,

Married Mary Rice, b. 9/19/ 1646

8 children: Thomas, Nathan, David, Jonathon, David, Gershom, Mary, and Elnathan.


3rd and 4th generations: no information was given.


5th generation: Thomas Brigham b. 1742, d. 1800

m. Susan Eels

5 children; Orlean, Don Ferdinand,. Royal, Eunice, Alexander, (our ancestor)


6th generation: Alexander Brigham, b. 1/26/1770,

m. Sarah Whitten

6 Children: Sarah, Anne, William, George, Eunice Fanny, (our ancestor)


7th generation: Fanny Brigham b. 5/24/1805, d. 5/24/1884

married Martin Watson, b. 8/19/1795.

They had 6 sons:

Don Alonzo, b, 3/22/1825

William B. , b 2/21 d, 11/24/ 1910

Charles M. b, 2/1/1829 d. 1873

Nathan Greenleaf. b.3/13/1831 d. 7/14/1911 - (our ancestor)

George B. b. 2/10/1893 d. 1/26/1852

Martin b. 12/12/1835 d. 12/7/1847

one adopted son - Emer G, b. 6/9/1847 d. 3/1850


          Nathan Greenleaf Watson, b. 3/13/1831, d. 7/4/1911, was our Great- Grandfather. He was born at Sacketts Harbor, New York. He married Mary Barbara Walrath on October 16, 1855 at German, N.Y. She was born May 14, 1831, at Homer, New York, d. October 24, 1915 at Grand Lodge, Michigan.



7 children:

Emer C. b. 8/20/1856 d. 3/8/1935

Sarah Ella b. 9/23/1858 d. 1931 married George Kenyon. She was called Elly.

Cora D. b. 6/16/1861 d. 5/16/1931 m. a Mr Depew

Ida Jane b 9/18/1867 d. June 1945. (Married Earle James Patterson in 1887)

Mary Augusta b.11/25/1870 d. 1943 Called Gustie, married Mr. Bill Guinan

Clara May b. 12/17/1865 Called Clarey, married Mr. Wolpert

Fanny B. b. 3/22/1875, d. 7/21/1921 married Mr. Russell


          The Watsons were farmers, My Grandma wrote a very interesting account of the family. It tells of their trip to Michigan, acquiring the family farm at Grand Ledge and many incidents in their life there. I cant find it in my mixed-up boxes of keepsakes. If ever do find it, I will send a copy to you,

          The Watson family members, many of them, are buried in a cemetery not far from the Watson home place, Union Cemetery, Grand Ledge, Michigan



Nathan Greenleaf WATSON

Sex:   Male

Father:          Martin WATSON (19 Aug 1795-)

Mother:         Fanny BRINGHAM (24 May 1805-24 May 1884)


Individual Facts

Birth   13 Mar 1831 in Sacketts Harbor, New York

Death 4 Jul 1911 (age 80)


Marriages/Children

1. Mary Barbara WALRATH

Marriage       16 Oct 1855 in Homer, New York (age 24)

Children        Emer C. WATSON (20 Aug 1856-8 Mar 2935)

          Sarah Ella (Elly) WATSON (23 Sep 1858-1931)

          Cora D. WATSON (16 Jun 1861-6 May 1931)

          Ida Jane WATSON (18 Sep 1867-Jun 1945)

          Mary Augusta (Gustie) WATSON (25 Nov 1870-1943)

          Clara May .(Clarey) WATSON (17 Dec 1865-)

          Fanny B. WATSON (22 Mar 1875-21 Jul 1921)



              HISTORY OF N. G. Watson Family


          Nathan Greenleaf Watson was the fourth son of Martin and Fanny Watson was born March 13, 1831, in Sacketts Harbor, New York. On October 13, 1855, he was married to Mary B. Walworth of Homer, New York and went to reside in German, Chenango County, New York, where their first three children were born. In February, 1860, in company with Al deWight, Father started for Michigan with a team. It took them six weeks to drive them. On arriving in Michigan, he at once located on the farm where he lived so many years and where the last four daughters were born. In March he was followed by Mother and Emer, Ella and Cora the three oldest children who came through by train and arrived at Lansing. The depot was then three miles out of town and the taxi that met the trains to convey passengers to the city was a yoke of oxen hitched to a long sled; the road was made of logs. On arriving in Lansing, Mother had to stay all night at the first class hotel, or tavern then, which was so cold that the landlady kindly gave up her own bed for Mother and the Children because they were so tired and on account of the small baby, she said they would be warmer (no steam heat in those days). The next day Mother hired a man to take her to Delhi to the home of Uncle William where she stayed a few days. Then Uncle William took her to her new home in Oneida, Eaten County where they lived the rest of their lives.

          In regards to the early life in Michigan they saw times which our younger generation would hardly think true. At one time Father wanted to write a letter to New York State, but had not a cent to send it with (or rather three cents which I think it was at that time) so he drove to Delhi a distance of twenty-five miles for a postage stamp.

          One night Father was taken sick, Mother did all she could and he was getting worse all the time so Mother took the old dog and hung to his collar with one hand the old tin lantern with the other and went through the woods for a mile and a half to the house of the late John Wolport, he being the only man that had a horse, to go and get a doctor not knowing whether Father would be alive when she got back, but he was.

          For several years they got their mail at mud Creek, Post Office which was kept by a man by the name of Smith Johnson on the farm now owned by Lee Bennett (one of our family) four miles West of Grand Ledge. In 1865 Father built a barn and drew the lumber and shingles with a team from Union. One night when he was coming home with a load he got in sight of home and saw the house was on fire, thought at first he would hitch his team as he could go faster foot, but then he saw a man on the roof so he drove home. The fire was caused by the little girls getting their picture books and carrying a candle upstairs .

          Father and Mother had the first treadle machine, the first mowing machine, grain reaper, hay fork, and oil lamp in the School District No. 8. The lamp was tipped over by the children tipping over the stand and it exploded. It was three years before Mother would have one again. I was a small girl, but can remember when it was lighted we all had to stand back expecting it to go off like a stick of dynamite. In 1874 Father built the new house (on the farm which is now owned by the oldest girl, Ella, and husband) drawing the pine lumber from up North with a team. He would take up a load of butter and trade at the lumber camps.

          In 1866 Father and John Capwell bought a saw mill which they operated for several years. Then it burned down and was rebuilt, Father buying Capwell out and then nearly sunk what means he had.

          When Mother came to Michigan she brought her canary bird in a tin lantern. The lantern was a piece of tin punched full of holes with a piece of candle for a light which was the only lantern they used for years as I guess in his younger years Father would get his chores done before dark.

          Father was township drain commissioner for several years and used to say he could see a wet hole that needed to be drained farther than a Methodist minister could see a nickel.

          He at one time was justice of the peace and married one couple, but said the knot slipped and didn't stay tied so he never tried it again.

          Mother was always called as good a cook as there was in Eaten County which may account for some of the good things we had for dinner each day as she had five daughters here.

          On October 16, 1905, they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, Mother wearing her wedding dress; she also was buried in it. It was of blue silk which she earned working by the week for the sum on one dollar per week on a dairy farm where they kept from 75 to 100 cows. She helped with the milking. The milk in those days was set in crocks and pans all skimmed by hand. The butter was all worked by hand. (How would you girls like to work like that?) She sat up nights to make her clothes which were all made by hand. And when she was married the lady where she worked so long gave her a wedding present, the butter ladle she had used while there which she continued on using.

          One of the things my Father and Mother liked to tell was that they had seven children and never called a doctor for them as long as they were at home. There never was a break in the family until 1911 when Father died. In October, 1916, Mother followed him and in 1921 was followed by their baby, Fannie, then a woman of 46 years. Mother would never ride in an automobile (a go devil as she always called them) until after her death, there being no horse drawn hearse; she rode in one to her last resting place. Of Fathers' and Mothers' family I don't know as there is much to tell out of the ordinary except there never was but one divorce in the family, never a second marriage. They have one grandson, Leon Earl Patterson (my son) who was in the World War for eighteen months, he being the only soldier for Uncle Sam in our family since his great grandfather, Martin Watson, who was a soldier in the War of 1812. There never has been but one arrest in the family and that was for one boy taking a man by the bottom of the pant leg. There are now living descendants of Nathan and Mary Watson: six children, 26 grandchildren, and 42 great grandchildren making a total of 74. No trace of suicide here, you can plainly tell, and must acknowledge we've all done well.


Ida Watson Patterson

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          The paper I have is an old, type-written one, and has no date. There is a hand written note at the bottom, showing that Ida Watson Patterson had a daughter, Amy, and a son Ivan, (presumably written by my father.) Ida refers to the World War, which makes me think that the above paper may have been written in the late nineteen-thirties, or perhaps early nineteen forties. She was clearly not thinking about the Second World War.

          I have left the story as I found it, with a couple of corrections. Great Grandmother Ida spelled nickel as nickle, which I corrected, as I did for dynamite, which she spelled as dymanite. Her last sentence originally started: "No race suicide here.." which I transcribed as "No trace of suicide here." In her day, divorce, being arrested, or any trace of suicide in a family was a disgrace.

          A short time ago Ida Watson, and her father, Nathan Greenleaf Watson, were only names on a family tree time line. Now I feel I know them, having glimpsed a bit into their lives.


Paul Lyndon Phillips, Great Grandson of Ida Watson Patterson

Old Wagon Road, Yadkinville, North Carolina.




Martin WATSON

Sex:   Male

Individual Facts

Birth   19 Aug 1795

Military          1814 in Prior's Regiment NY Militia War of 1812 (age 19)


Marriages/Children

1. Fanny BRINGHAM

Children        Don Alonzo WATSON (22 Mar 1825-)

          William B. WATSON (21 Feb 1910-24 Nov 1910)

          Charles M. WATSON (1 Feb 1829-1873)

          Nathan Greenleaf WATSON (13 Mar 1831-4 Jul 1911)

          Geroge B. WATSON (10 Feb 1833-26 Jan 1852)

          Martin WATSON (12 Dec 1835-7 Dec 1847)

          Emer G. WATSON (9 Jun 1847-Mar 1850)


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MARTIN WATSON, Military Record


          Martin Watson, Private, was drafted into the military and served for three months in Prior's Regiment, New York State Militia, during the period of the War of 1812. His enlistment dates are from September 12, to December 12, 1814. They paid him for three months enlistment, and they tacked on an additional nine days time for pay purposes. Private Martin was paid eight dollars a month, for a grand total of twenty-six dollars and thirty-two cents. That means they paid him two dollars and thirty two cents extra, and allowed him nine days travel time. There is nothing remarkable about his record, there being only one cryptic remark: Salisbury, Montgomery, 195 miles.


          I have a series of papers that belonged to my father, Ivan Phillips. Among them are photocopies of Martin Watson's Military record. As the photocopy is somewhat difficult to read with the naked eye, scanning it in is out of the question. What I will do is reconstruct what I can from what I have.


Watson, Martin, Pvt.

Prior's Regiment, N. Y. Militia

(1812)


My photocopy is in three columns, and is a little hard to understand. It appears that the most recent file of the three is on the left, the oldest is on the right. In any case, here it is:


Column on the right:


Prior's Regiment. N. Y. Militia;

Martin Watson Pvt,

{ Capt. William J. Dodge's Company of Detached Militia;

(War of 1812);

Appears on Company Muster Roll for

Sept 13th to 29, 1814.

Date of appointment or enlistment,

} Sept 13, 1814.

To what time engaged or enlisted,

} 3 or 6 months.

Present or absent,

present.

Remarks and alterations since last muster: Draft.


Column in the center:


Prior's Regiment. N. Y. Militia;

Martin Watson Pvt,

{ Capt. William J. Dodge's Company of Detached Militia, Lieut. Col John Prior's Regiment;

(War of 1812);

Appears on Company Muster Roll for

Sept 29 to Dec 6, 1814.

Roll Dated

Dec 6, 1814

Date of appointment or enlistment,

} Sept 12, 1814.

To what time engaged or enlisted,

} Dec 12, 1814.

Present or absent,

present.

Remarks and alterations since last muster: Salsbury, Montgomery, 195 miles.



Column on the left:


Prior's Regiment. N. Y. Militia;

Martin Watson Pvt,

{ Capt. William J. Dodge's Company of Detached Militia, Lieut. Col Prior's Regiment;

(War of 1812);

Appears on Company Pay Roll for

Sept to Dec, 1814.

Commencement of service, or of this enlistment, } Sept 12, 1814.

Expiration of service, or of this settlement, } Dec 12, 1814.

Term of service charged, 3 months 9 days.

Pay per month, 8 dollars.

Amount of pay, 26 dollars, 32 cents.

Remark: - This company was discharged at Plattsburgh and belonged to the county of Montgomery, and are allowed travel from the place of discharge according to the respective distances of the several town in which they resided, as set down in the Muster Rolls.

Remarks: Allowed 9 days travel.



Mom’s Side of the Family


Frances Amelia FEGLEY

Sex:   Female

Father:          James Charles FEGLEY (-)

Mother:         Gladys Mae HAMILTON (-)

Birth   19 Apr 1926 in Seneca Falls, New York


Marriages/Children

1. Ivan James PHILLIPS

Marriage       15 Aug 1947 in Seneca Falls, New York (age 21)

Children        Gale Frances PHILLIPS (24 Oct 1949-)

          Paul Lyndon PHILLIPS (12 Mar 1952-)



James Charles FEGLEY

Sex:   Male

Father:          Harry Seymor FEGLEY (-)

Mother:         Amelia STEVENSON (-)


From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My mother was the source of this information, and these are generally her words:


The children of James Charles Fegley and Gladys Mae Hamilton, in order of age

Frances Amelia

James

Joan Evelin, married Tom Densmore, who worked for Goulds Pumps, the way James Charles Fegly did


          Mom: My father ( James Charles Fegley) was a machinist. He worked for the Goulds Pumps company, in Seneca Falls, New York. Later on he took over my grandfather, your great Grandfather's furniture store. ( Harry Seymor Fegley).

           My father (James Charles Fegley) was born and raised in what they call the Flats, he was born and raised in what they call the Old Seneca Falls, which is now under Van Cleaf Lake. (spelling?) When they built the Barge Canal they flooded Old Seneca Falls, and everybody came up on the Heights. The town was rebuilt up higher.

 

  

 

 

Harry Seymor FEGLEY

 

Marriages/Children

1. Amelia STEVENSON

Children        James Charles FEGLEY (-)

          Mildred FEGLEY (-)

          Florence FEGLEY (-)

          Harry FEGLEY (-In his teens)

 

Emigration: Harry Seymor Fegley came up from Pennsylvania to the Finger Lakes area of New York State. He was Pennsylvania Dutch.

 

 

From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My mother was the source of this information, and these are generally her words:

 

            What we established (apparently just before starting the tape.) was that mom' s grandfather, my great-grandfather came out of Pennsylvania and was Pennsylvania Dutch. (Harry Seymour Fegley)

          Mom: The Fegley name has changed its' spelling.. The spelling today is F-e-g-l-e-y and was originally F-e-g-l-i-e. Feglie is Swiss.

          Paul: What happened to the Pennsylvania Dutch beliefs?

          Dad: A lot of people have left the restrictive beliefs of the Pennsylvania Dutch. As they became aware of how the other half lived they would back then, and still do, leave. The Pennsylvania Dutch beliefs were brought from the old country and are very restrictive. It's amazing that some of them still hold on.

          Mom: Your great-grandfather (on my mother's side) was Harry Seymour Fegley. He married Amelia Stevenson.

          Paul: Where was she from?

          Mom: I don't know. They had Mildred and James, my father, James Charles, and they had Florence. (They all lived in Seneca Falls, New York.) There were four children. Harry, the youngest one, died in his teens from Juvenile Diabetes. (Mildred, James Charles, Florence and Harry Fegley.) [James Charles Fegley was Mom's father and my grandfather. He was married to Gladys Hamilton]

            Mom: Your great Grandfather, Harry Seymor Fegley had a furniture store. For years and years my Grandpa sold high-class Grand Rapids Furniture in Seneca Falls, New York.

          Your great grandfather, Harry Seymor Fegley, when he was younger, was a salesman for American Tobacco Company. The family was originally from what they call the Flats, he was born and raised in what they call the Old Seneca Falls, which is now under Van Cleaf Lake. (spelling?) When they built the Barge Canal they flooded Old Seneca Falls, and everybody came up on the Heights. The town was rebuilt up higher.

 

 

 

William HAMILTON

Sex:   Male

Occupation   Boat Builder

Marriages/Children

1. Frances MCCRACKEN

Children        Gladys Mae HAMILTON (-)

          Howard HAMILTON (-)

          Ted HAMILTON (-)

          Gale HAMILTON (-)

 

 

From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My mother was the source of this information, and these are generally her words:

            

              Mom: On your grandmother's side was the Hamilton family. Grandpa Hamilton, your great-grandfather, was English. His name was William Hamilton and he was a boat builder. Grandma Hamilton's name was Frances. Her maiden name was McCracken. I was named after both of my grandmothers. Frances McCracken's brother, George McCracken was a Colonel in the Civil War. That is, if I remember what my mother said correctly. He fought for the North. (William and Frances McCracken Hamilton were my great grandparents on my grandmother's side. George McCracken was my great uncle on my grandmother's side.)

          Mom: Mother had three brothers Howard and Ted and Gale (Hamilton). Gale was fourteen years older and Ted was older than that. I can't remember how much older. Howard was the oldest one. [Gladys Hamilton was Mom's mother and my grandmother. She was married to James Charles Fegley.]

          There is some things I forgot to tell you. Your great grandmother Frances McCracken (Hamilton) did some tracing of the family tree and traced it all the way back to Alexander Hamilton. (the Alexander Hamilton.)

          My grandfather (William) Hamilton died when my mother (Gladys Mae Hamilton) was nine years old. He died of tuberculosis, of all things.

           There were rumors in our family that some Fegley moved down South and had a plantation down there. My father used to talk about that. I never was able to find out too much about that. There is a John Fegley in the South somewhere.

 

20011214.0536 Fri , Dec 14, 2001, 5 36AM Old Wagon Road, Yadkinville, North Carolina

          I have of the list of the siblings of my Grandmother, Amy Almira Patterson, my Grandfather, Lyndon Earle Phillips, and of my Great-Grandfather, Earle James Patterson, that are not in our “family line.” It looks like each had at least half dozen brothers- and- sisters. In the Phillips “line” spoken of, there are then children, of children, and so-on. That goes on for quite a while. Dad had input Gale’s various branches in, already, and his brother, Rodger’s in, as well. The above lists include all of Dad’s brothers- and sisters, and their offspring. For today, I am putting those lists aside. If anyone in the family wants a copy, let me know. I do plan to add them to the Family Origin’s for Windows program, and eventually type the information into a word-processing file. If you ever get into working with your family tree, you will find how confusing it can be. Paul Lyndon Phillips.

 

 

Arthur J. PATTERSON

Dad's grandfather on his Mother's side was Earl James Patterson.

One of his brother's name was Arthur.

 

Sex:   Male

Father:          Charles Arthur PATTERSON (19 Jul 1834-16 Apr 1906)

Mother:         Almira Arlintha JOSLIN (3 May 1840-23 Jun 1906)

Individual Facts; Misc Invented Flinch Game

 

From an audio tape. Ivan James Phillips, my father, Frances Amelia Fegley (Phillips) and I, Paul Lyndon Phillips talk about family history. Tape made July 17, 1989. My father was the source of this information, and in some places he cites a book on the Bi-Centennial of Phelps, New York: and these are generally his words:

 

             I told you about the Flinch card game, about the turn of the century. AJ Patterson invented the Flinch card game. It was in the early nineteen hundreds when he was in college that he and a roommate developed this card game. Apparently his roommate dropped out and did not follow through. He did. It became the craze of the country. We had old newspaper clippings. When he died they were reviewing what he had done. They said that stores used to have post signs in the windows as to whether they had Flinch in stock or not, that day, to keep people from mobbing the store. It was a game like Monopoly or any other game. I use to have a Flinch deck, but I don't know where it went. It was a big long deck with a whole bunch of numbers on each side. There were probably two hundred cards or something. I have no idea how it was played. My mother always used to tell me that her uncle invented Flinch.

          Paul: What year was this?

          Dad: Probably nineteen twelve or nineteen eight or something like that. It swept the country and my mother always used to tell me about it. I had been to Michigan once when I was four years old. I have a couple pictures that show me with some of my relations out there that I don't remember. She always used to talk about her uncle who invented that card game and made millions.

          Paul: What did he do with his money?

          Dad: He lost it in the crash of 1929. I started hearing about his death when I was in Korea. The first thing I got was a notice from a lawyer that he had died. Since I was in the service overseas I was in his will. His estate was finally down to two- hundred- and- eighty- thousand- dollars when he died It had been much more than that. The only reason I was in his will is because he never had any children of his own. The wife that was living at the time he died had been the nurse. He left money in trust for her until she died. When she died it was split up.

 

               Notes from another source: I have a paper signed by Phyllis Glen on April 27, 1995. Her address then was 308 Woodruff St.; Union City, MI. 49094. Notes follow, may be written by her, maybe by Uncle Roy, dad's brother:

          Arthur Patterson- He lived at Kalamazoo, Michigan. Was our "rich" uncle. (Would be my Great- Grand Uncle- PLP.) He was a partner in a book store in Kazoo. The story was that he bought the game of Flinch from a bum for $5.00. He refined the game and made lots of money from it before selling the rights to others. He married twice. Second wife's name was Blanche.